Choosing High Vibrational Music

high vibration musicAs you grow and heal, you may find that some of the music you used to listen to doesn’t appeal to you as much. The reason is that you are raising your vibration, and music with a lower vibration is making you feel irritated or uncomfortable. To support your healing, it’s important to seek out music that has a higher vibration. But what does that sound like?

A few years ago, we had the good fortune to see Andre Rieu and his orchestra at the Rose Garden. He is a fine example of a musician who works in a higher vibration because he infuses all that he does with his own joy. Watching him perform, I knew that this man was a total mush. He’s happy, he’s joyful, he likes to have fun, and he probably cries when he watches a sad movie. It’s no wonder he was drawn to Johann Strauss. Honestly, there are few forms of music more joyful than a waltz. It would take a determined grouch not to feel uplifted by hearing one. When Andre played “The Blue Danube,” people got up and danced in the aisles.

Of course, Andre plays more than just waltzes. During the course of the evening, we heard everything from classical pieces to movie themes and popular songs. At one point, he played “America the Beautiful,” and the older gentleman standing next to me wiped tears from his eyes afterward: it brought forth his love of his homeland. A rendering of “Amazing Grace,” complete with bagpipe, also brought tears to many eyes, as it often does. You don’t have to subscribe to any particular religion or spirituality to feel the depth of God’s love for all of us, and how affecting that truly is.

By the end of the evening, balloons had fallen on the audience, and everyone was dancing and playing with the balloons while the orchestra played on. In short, the audience was behaving like children. In the span of two brief hours, music had taken us back to our child selves. We danced and sang along with the abandon of three-year-olds. Now that is music of a higher vibration!

Emotion is the Key

None of this means that you are destined to listen only to classical music or Enya for the rest of your days. Not all classical music has a high vibration, just as not all rock or pop has a low one. The trick is to learn to discern for yourself. The key to a song’s vibration is emotion. Emotion is a very powerful energy. When combined with music, it has a definite effect on your mind, mood, and sense of well-being. Angry or depressive music can fuel these same emotions in you. Likewise, calm or joyful music can produce these feelings in you as well. And of course, there’s a lot of emotion in between, some of which is helpful, and some of which can be harmful.

When listening to any music, you should tune in to how it makes you feel. This doesn’t necessarily have anything to do with the lyrics, however. For example, there is nothing wrong with listening to some sad songs. Sad songs say so much, as Elton said. And a few swear words are not necessarily an indicator that you should drop the CD in the trash, either. No, you have to tune into the energy of the music. This takes some practice.

You can really love an artist’s music, but if they have an overly cynical world view or a depressive personality, this energy may be in their music and will affect you negatively. On the other hand, this doesn’t mean that an artist has to live like a saint and be perfectly healed. Many artists have personal struggles and still manage to infuse love and joy in their music. Human beings are multi-faceted, and we all experience the range of emotions, positive and negative.

How Does it Make You Feel?

The next time you’re listening to your favorite music, ask yourself how you feel. Do you feel sad? Sad is not a bad feeling. Some of the most beautiful music ever written tells a sad story that can make you weep a river of tears. And this is OK—unless you’re wallowing in sad music because you’re depressed. There should be a balance in all things.

Likewise, however, some music makes you feel happy or joyful. This is my favorite kind. Artists like Neil Diamond, the Beach Boys, and John Denver are masters at expressing joy in their music. And Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” speaks for itself.

Of course, most music falls into a vast “in between” area of complex emotion. Determining how you feel when you hear it may take some time. For example, it’s possible for a song to be uplifting, critical, gritty, and hopeful, all at once. For me, U2 and Bob Dylan fall into this category.

Problematic music will make you feel angry, depressed, or hopeless. These are all indicators of a lower vibration, and you should avoid it. Just as a joyful song can make you feel like a happy three-year-old again, a lower vibrational song will only serve to make you feel worse about yourself and your life. With practice, however, you can soon determine whether an album belongs in your collection or not. Follow your own inner guidance.

I also want to encourage you to check out a lot of the new musicians out there. Many of them are doing good work at a higher vibration, as our crystal and rainbow kids grow up. You may not hear them on the radio, unfortunately. Some artists who are less well known sell through sites such as CDBaby.com. Many may only perform locally as they struggle to get started. Keep your ears—and your heart—open and ask for good music to come into your life. Music can be very healing, and when it is, it’s a blessing in our lives.

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